Guide to the New UN Trafficking Protocol

Janice G. Raymond January 1, 2001 United States

The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children creates a global language and legislation to define trafficking in persons.

INTRODUCTION

"The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children is a wide-ranging international agreement to address the crime of trafficking in persons, especially women and children, on a transnational level. It creates a global language and legislation to define trafficking in persons, especially women and children; assist victims of trafficking; and prevent trafficking in persons. The trafficking in persons protocol also establishes the parameters of judicial cooperation and exchanges of information among countries. Although the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children anticipates accomplishing what national legislation cannot do on its own, it is also intended to jumpstart national laws and to harmonize regional legislation against the trafficking in women and children. 

"In December 2000,148 countries gathered in Palermo, Italy to attend a high-level conference opening the new UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime to States signature. Of the 148 countries present, 121 signed the new UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime, and over 80 countries signed one of its supplementary protocols — the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children .Another supplementary Protocol Against the Smuggling of Migrants by Land, Sea and Air was also open for States signature, and a third Protocol on the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms is expected to be completed at the end of 2001.The new UN Convention and its supplementary protocol on trafficking in persons have to be ratified by 40 countries before they become instruments of international law.

"The Protocol promises to contest the world s organized crime networks and combat the trade in human beings and transnational prostitution. In an age of globalization of capital, information and technology, organized trafficking operates as a transnational industry not contained by national borders. The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children specifically addresses the trade in human beings for purposes of the exploitation of prostitution and other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labor or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude and the removal of organs."

Attached file: Guideun_protocolENG.pdf